We are Meant to Pulse – SXSW 2011: The internet is over

A related danger of the merging of online and offline life, says business thinker Tony Schwartz, is that we come to treat ourselves, in subtle ways, like computers. We drive ourselves to cope with ever-increasing workloads by working longer hours, sucking down coffee and spurning recuperation. But “we were not meant to operate as computers do,” Schwartz says. “We are meant to pulse.” When it comes to managing our own energy, he insists, we must replace a linear perspective with a cyclical one: “We live by the myth that the best way to get more work done is to work longer hours.” Schwartz cites research suggesting that we should work in periods of no greater than 90 minutes before seeking rest. Whatever you might have been led to imagine by the seeping of digital culture into every aspect of daily life – and at times this week in Austin it was easy to forget this – you are not, ultimately, a computer.

Our online and offline lives are merging. That does not mean we have to work like computers.

A cyclical perspective on doing allows us to bring humanizing balance to all our activities. Keep flowing in circles and spirals of activity and rest. The world is a whole lot more manageable with a cyclical perspective.

The excerpt above is from the end of an interesting article about the thought that the boundary between ‘real life’ and ‘online’ has disappeared. If you do not live in the tech bubble like SXSWers this boundary still exists but it’s getting thinner as we interact in more ways with more connected devices. If you’re interested in this boundary go read the full article at the via link above.

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